Class 1 Medical FAQ

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When can I renew/ revalidate my license?

45 days before the end of the medical certificate.

I wear contact lenses. Should I wear them to my medical?

If you wear contact lenses whilst flying,  I prefer if you wear your spare glasses and bring in your contact lens. Please remove the contacts 24 hrs before the assessment and we will then test your vision without and then with the contacts in.

Should I bring an updated optician’s eye prescription to my medical?
In short Yes. The form should  include the following information

Should I contact the CAA if I am unfit to fly?

I can advise on fitness and will liaise with the CAA on your behalf if needs be and issue you an official ‘Temporary Unfit’ letter if appropriate.

What age can someone fly solo?
Under EASA there is no lower age limit for a Class 2 initial medical licenses but an individual needs to be over 17 to fly solo.

I have a colour deficiency since birth will this prevent me from becoming a commercial pilot?

Not necessarily. As long as the colour deficiency you have is deemed colour safe then you could go one to have a rich and fulfilling career as a pilot.

The test which is done is via Ishihara plates. If there is an error in your colour perception then you would be referred to get a CAD test. Passing the CAD would mean your colour deficiency was deemed safe to operate aircraft in all lighting conditions. Your license would not be restricted or endorsed in any way.

If you however didn’t manage to reach the safe thresholds you could still gain a pilots license but could only fly during daylight hours.

For more information about CAD ( Colour Assessment and Diagnosis) test click on the following link.. More information can be found hereOr watch the video on CAD here

Can I take antihistamines for my hay fever while I am flying?
The following medication is acceptable to use whilst flying: Loratadine,
Desloratadine, Cetirizine, Fexofenadine. Beconase and Flixonase nasal sprays are also permitted. You should take them when not flying to check for any possible side effects and also to see an improvement in your hay fever symptoms before you return to flying

You cannot fly within 24 hours of taking other antihistamines.

I have been told I am obese, will this affect my medical?
Those with a BMI in excess of 35 require additional cardiovascular risk estimation and a medical flight test. More information here. 

Do I have to have a Class 1 medical to instruct?
No, from 17 September 2012 EASA Class 2 license holders can be paid for instructing.

I have an OML limitation on my Class 1 licence, does this affect my Class 2 privileges?
No. An OML only applies to Class 1 privileges, therefore a Class 1 licesne holder with OML can instruct on the basis of his Class 2 status as single pilot.

Can you arrange additional blood tests like Cholesterol, Thyroid, Vitamins, PSA, Allergy or Clotting risks?
Yes we can arrange all types of testing.

Can you also update Travel Vaccines like Yellow Fever or prescribe Malaria medications?

Yes as a travel clinic we can update all currently available vaccinations and preventative strategies against Malaria.

What if my blood pressure is up and I have white coat hypertension- will I get my license?

Occasionally people attending their medical find that their blood pressure (BP) is elevated.

This may be due to subtle anxiety related to the medical, morning coffee, a morning medical  or it may in fact be due to chronically elevated blood pressure (Hypertension).

A reasonable way to remove doubt is by checking blood pressure readings at home.

Omron BP machines which check BP through a arm cuff have been validated to do this.

I would recommend buying one which can store data and measuring home blood pressure morning and evening for a few weeks before the medical is due.

If the BP is regularly above 140/90 then I would suggest reviewing the findings with you GP before the aeromedical assessment.

Other ways to reduce blood pressure is by reducing salt from the diet, reducing alcohol, reducing weight and undertaking more cardiovascular exercise.

If the blood pressure is less than 140/90 then bring the readings to the aeromedical assessment.

Further information can be reviewed on this helpful CAA hypertension flow chart

What is the process if I’ve recent had surgery

Its not uncommon for pilots to need surgery at some point whether this is for musculoskeletal issues like back surgery or for unexpected events like an appendicectomy.

As soon as you’ve had surgery-

You MUST NOT to use the previleges  of your license and must ground yourself.

You are further required to contact the Aeromedical Examiner who has issued your previous aeromedical certificate.

You can do this by clicking on the link below or calling us on 0333 4043232 if we did your last medical assessment.

The AME will issue you with a Temporary Unit letter and give you a process to follow to enable your license to be re-instated.

This normally involves waiting for your treating doctors/ specialists to give you the all clear to return to work and issuing you with a letter detailing what occurred, any complications or medications needed and whether there are plans for future reviews or management.

Once you have this letter you should contact the Aeromedical doctor who can then give further direction. Sometimes this just means an update to the CAA to re-instate your license, at other times this would entail having a functional assessment check with the AME to ensure your safe to operate the aircraft before contacting the CAA.

The process is usually straight forward.

The re-instatement proformas can be found in the Useful Links section on this webpage.